Posts tagged ‘Interviews’

New Tara Sharp Novel ‘Sharp Turn’ Released

Award-winning author Marianne Delacourt has just unveiled the new look for her action-packed crime series Tara Sharp and a rewrite of the gripping second novel Sharp Turn. Under the crime imprint Deadlines, this version of Sharp Turn is published by Twelfth Planet Press, an advocate of women’s voices in science fiction, fantasy, horror and crime genres and a natural home for Delacourt. The re-release offers new and revised material for fans of Tara’s exploits, but retaining the humour, peril and paranormal flavour of the original release.

The latest in her series of ‘funny, sexy, smart crime novels for men and women’, Sharp Turn sees Tara’s unconventional PI business evolving, and she’s attracted some interesting customers.  With her dryly humorous take on the world, Tara is expected to both charm new audiences and delight old fans this winter, as she confronts a shady job in the high octane world of the motor cycle industry. Luckily, Tara is better equipped than most, with the uncanny ability to read people’s auras. Armed with a vanilla slice and backed up by her pet galah, Tara is about to come head-to-head with some very dangerous characters.

Book One in the Tara Sharp series, Sharp Shooter was the 2010 winner of the Davitt Award for Best Crime Novel and nominated for the Ned Kelly Award 2010 Best First Crime Novel. Expect the release of Book Three Too Sharp and Book Four Sharp Edge in early 2017.

Author MARIANNE DELACOURT says, “Tara is a protagonist who really grows with her readers. To begin with, she’s an outgoing Australian girl who’s never really taken responsibility for herself. Her unusual gift puts her in some risky situations and through her tenacity and resourcefulness she comes out on top. The series shows her learning how to find a meaningful way to use her gift, while trying to maintain normal relationships with the people around her. She’s just trying to make a living, stay alive, and keep her sense of humour.”

Praise for the Tara Sharp series:

“Australia’s Marianne Delacourt delivers the laughs and action with her sassy, unorthodox PI Tara Sharp…” The Herald Sun

“Tara Sharp is a gust of fresh air in the local crime fiction scene. While it is wonderful that our more literary crime writers are finally getting the attention they deserve, there’s still plenty of room for fast-paced commercial female-oriented Australian crime fiction. And Marianne Delacourt (aka sci-fi writer Marianne de Pierres) has certainly nailed that brief.” The Australian Bookseller and Publisher

“Delacourt has invented a Stephanie Plum character who is just as ballsy and loveable but this one lives in Perth and has two pet Galahs instead of a hamster. An easy read with multiple story layers, Sharp Turn will keep you guessing till the end, pick it up this summer if you like Janet Evanovich and Val McDermid’s Blue Genes.” She Said

Sharp Turn is available now from Twelfth Planet Press. Book One Sharp Shooter is available from Twelfth Planet Press and from Amazon.

Author MARIANNE DELACOURT is the alter ego of award-winning, internationally published Science Fiction writer Marianne de Pierres. Renowned for dark satire in her Science Fiction, Marianne offers lighter, funnier writing under her Delacourt penname. As Delacourt, Marianne is also the author of Young Adult fiction series Night Creatures (Burn Bright, Angel Arias and Shine Light). She is a co-founder of the Vision Writers Group and ROR – wRiters on the Rise, a critiquing group for professional writers. Marianne lives in Brisbane with her husband and two galahs.

Australian Publisher TWELFTH PLANET PRESS is a Perth-based publisher, seeking to challenge the status quo with books that interrogate, commentate and inspire. While showcasing the depth and breadth of Australian fiction to a wider audience, Twelfth Planet Press aims to and provide opportunities for fiction written by female writers, raising awareness of women’s voices in science fiction, fantasy, horror and crime genres.

Interview with Kathryn White (Writers on Wednesday)

Tarran Author Pic2

I’ve just been interviewed by writer and blogger Kathryn White for her Writers on Wednesday segment:

It was so much fun 😀 I hope you all enjoy it!

Here is the link to the interview! WRITERS ON WEDNESDAY – TARRAN JONES

Twice Upon A Time Blog Tour: An Interview with Dale W. Glaser

CONTRARY to the title of this anthology, working with such a talented cast of writers is an opportunity that usually comes once in a lifetime. From best-selling to greenhorn, independent or traditionally-published, the authors in this anthology span all ranges in addition to spanning the globe—from England to Australia and all over the United States. I’ve had the privilege of getting to know each and every one of them, and they have become a part of my extended family. I’ve even caught a glimpse of a secret side of them that only another writer…editor…is privy to witness through their words.

Through this series of posts, I plan on introducing you to my new family through a mini-interview of each. You may not get a chance to see their secret side, but you’ll get a sneak-peek into their minds, their passions and inspirations, and what made them the writers they are today.

..The Mini Interview..

1. At what age did you start writing?

I always answer this question with “seven,” which is approximately right, and as close as I’m going to get since I don’t remember specifically. Maybe as young as six, maybe not until I was eight, somewhere around there. I can remember sitting at the kitchen table, writing and illustrating stories about an anthropomorphic raccoon and squirrel who were detectives/crimefighters, but not exactly how old I was. I can also remember writing a text-only fantasy story about warriors slaying a monster, specifically using the phrase “blood and guts,” which I was so proud of I asked my teacher if I could read it to the class. I’m reasonably sure that was third grade at the latest.

2. Which book introduced you to Speculative Fiction?

I feel like speculative fiction was always all around me. Star Wars came out before I turned three, I had a steady supply of superhero comic books as I was learning to read, and my favorite Saturday morning cartoons were things like Space Ghost and Thundarr the Barbarian. It’s probably more apt to say that speculative fiction was my gateway to reading grown-up novels at a young age, to get my fix of alternate world-building, and The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien was my entry point.

3. Do you have an all-time favorite book? What about it makes it your favorite?

It’s a toss-up between The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams and Good Omens by Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett. In both cases I love the overall sense of humor of the work. They’re written by people who know and love spec-fic, and therefore recognize many of the things inherent to the genre which are fairly ridiculous. So they poke fun at the tropes, not mean-spiritedly, but while embracing them. It’s a neat and highly entertaining trick.

4. Which author and/or book inspired you to start writing?

When I was very young I started writing down the stories in my head just because it felt like the thing to do, but when I was a teenager I became utterly addicted to Stephen King. I had been reading novels by various authors for years, and I thought of short stories as assignments for English class, but King‘s collections like Night Shift and Skeleton Crew made me realize that writers didn’t have to spend years cranking out doorstop epics. That was the point at which I started getting serious about my own short fiction again.

5. What would you say is the most important lesson all writers should learn?

First drafts are supposed to be terrible, and no story can exist without running that gauntlet. I have heard other writers lament, and know I have felt the pains myself as well, how they start a story and can’t bear to finish it because it isn’t turning out as well as they’d hoped. An unfinished, abandoned story is such a shame. Better to plug away at the first draft and recognize it as one step in the process, finish it, take a breather, and come back to it. Alone or with help, a first draft can be reworked into a second, and ultimately into something worthwhile. It’s not easy, but if it were easy, everyone would do it, right?

6. Of the entire publishing process, which would you say is the most difficult aspect to endure?

Waiting for feedback, or in some cases having to live without it. In my ideal world, every time I started to write a story it would be because of a pre-existing demand, and every progress update I gave would bring a rapturous response, and once I got the story done I would be spoiled for choice of people with whom I could discuss the results. Instead, a story is written mostly in isolation, submitted blindly, and often as not rejected without comment. If it’s accepted, it still remains unseen for a long time during the production process, and then once it’s unleashed upon the world, it’s extremely unlikely to receive one percent of the attention that its creation took from me. Fortunately I tend to see having a story published at all as its own worthwhile reward, because if I waited for spontaneous praise I’d be in a near-constant state of disappointment.

7. From where did the inspiration for your submission arise?

To name-check the fairy tale that inspired my submission would give away one of the twists it’s built around, so I will coyly avoid specifics here. I will say that the concept of the anthology, not only re-telling fairy tales but mashing them up with other genres, was an inspiration itself, as I decided to take things in a dark science-fiction direction in order to create a rational explanation for the fantastic elements of the original. The original fairy tale is an old favorite of mine, largely because it was never Disney-fied. (I think it was probably adapted by other animation studios, but I never sought those out.) Nothing against the Disney classics, but there’s a lot of appeal in working with less well-covered source material.

8. If applicable, did you have a favorite character (to write) from your story? If so, what sets them apart from the others?

My story is largely a one-woman show, so obviously she’s my favorite. I did enjoy writing Melise, given her unique position as essentially a blank slate, not being acted upon by other characters, only reacting to her environment and driven by her internal desire to figure herself out.

9. On what projects are you currently working?

I have a story in the editing process now for the upcoming Pro Se anthology PIRATES AND MONSTERS. I’m also working on the next adventure of Kellan Oakes, private investigator and son of a druid, a sequel to his holiday adventure from the PulpWork Christmas Special 2014, which should be part of the 2015 edition. Lots of other unofficial stuff in the hopper, too. These days I’m never not writing!

Read Dale’s story, My Name is Melise, in your very own copy of Twice Upon A Time today!

Choose a format…
Amazon|Kindle
Amazon|Paperback

..About the Author..

DALE W. GLASER is a lifelong collector, re-teller and occasional inventor of fantasy tales. His short stories have previously been published in How the West Was Weird (Volumes II and III). He currently lives in Virginia with his wife and three children, none of whom have been definitively proven to be changelings (yet).

..Connect with the Author..

Twice Upon A Time Blog Tour: An Interview with Steven Anthony George

Here is another interview with the Twice Upon a Time authors. Introducing Steven Anthony George!

CONTRARY to the title of this anthology, working with such a talented cast of writers is an opportunity that usually comes once in a lifetime. From best-selling to greenhorn, independent or traditionally-published, the authors in this anthology span all ranges in addition to spanning the globe—from England to Australia and all over the United States. I’ve had the privilege of getting to know each and every one of them, and they have become a part of my extended family. I’ve even caught a glimpse of a secret side of them that only another writer…editor…is privy to witness through their words.

Through this series of posts, I plan on introducing you to my new family through a mini-interview of each. You may not get a chance to see their secret side, but you’ll get a sneak-peek into their minds, their passions and inspirations, and what made them the writers they are today.

..The Mini Interview..

1. At what age did you start writing?

I wrote stories when I was in elementary school that caught the attention of teachers and as a boy I often improvised bedtime stories for my sister. I did not begin writing fiction seriously, however, until I turned fifty, when I had decided to no longer pursue poetry and playwriting on a full-time basis.

2. Which book introduced you to Speculative Fiction?

I was first introduced to the genre in fifth grade when I read A Wind in the Door by Madeleine L’Engle. Much of that book influenced my writing as an adult, particularly in its loose treatment of time and space, and the reflection of universal concepts in very personal ones.

3. Do you have an all-time favorite book? What about it makes it your favorite?

My favorite novel has been The Other by Thomas Tryon. I never considered the book a horror story, but instead a morality tale about the consequences of indulgence. It fascinated me that boy’s delusion, which would be harmless in any other context, could destroy a family, almost an entire town. The book gave me my passion for the psychology of characters over their observable actions.

4. Which author and/or book inspired you to start writing?

It was not in fiction writers, but playwrights that I found inspiration. I found the language of Edward Albee and Tennessee Williams both strange and poetic and I wanted to write in a similar style.

5. What would you say is the most important lesson all writers should learn?

Pursue whatever kind of writing that you are the most passionate about. Write the way your heart tells you. Creative writing is an art and there are no rules in art. For every teacher who instructs a writer not to do a certain thing, there is a writer getting published who is doing that very thing.

6. Of the entire publishing process, which would you say is the most difficult aspect to endure?

The most difficult process is just getting a first draft finished. It is easy to begin writing and a simple task to revise what is whole, but seeing a story to completion and to my satisfaction is a challenge.

7. If applicable, did you have a favorite character (to write) from your story? If so, what sets them apart from the others?

I can quite honestly say that I have no favorite character among those I have created. The majority are either pathetic, immoral, or merely insane and I don’t like them. There is a character in the yet unpublished “Cannibalism” named Dmitri, however, who I admire because his combination of apparent innocence and clever insight.

8. On what projects are you currently working?

After I decided to change genres from poetry and short plays to short stories, I began adapting my plays and some of my longer poems to short stories in order to complete a collection for publication.

Read Steven’s story, Patient Griselda, in your very own copy of Twice Upon A Time today!

Choose a format…
Amazon|Kindle
Amazon|Paperback

..About the Author..

STEVEN ANTHONY GEORGE is a poet and short story writer who finds inspiration largely from historical events, visual art, and film. His work has appeared in Poet’s Haven, Houston & Nomadic Voices, and Cleaver Magazine, among others. In addition to having a story in Twice Upon A Time, his short story “Genevieve from the River” just recently appeared in Diner Stories, an anthology published by Mountain State Press.
Mr. George is active in the autism community and lectures on the topic of autism spectrum disorders. Formerly a resident of Dunkirk, NY and Marathon, FL, he now resides in Fairmont, WV where he works as a case manager for a homeless recovery program.

..Connect with the Author..

Twice Upon a Time Mini Interviews – Rose Blackthorn

Rose Blackthorn Mini-Interview

CONTRARY to the title of this anthology, working with such a talented cast of writers is an opportunity that usually comes once in a lifetime. From best-selling to greenhorn, independent or traditionally-published, the authors in this anthology span all ranges in addition to spanning the globe—from England to Australia and all over the United States. I’ve had the privilege of getting to know each and every one of them, and they have become a part of my extended family. I’ve even caught a glimpse of a secret side of them that only another writer…editor…is privy to witness through their words.

Through this series of posts, I plan on introducing you to my new family through a mini-interview of each. You may not get a chance to see their secret side, but you’ll get a sneak-peek into their minds, their passions and inspirations, and what made them the writers they are today.

..The Mini Interview..

1. At what age did you start writing?

I began “telling” myself stories at 12 or 13. When I was a few years older, maybe 16 it occurred to me that if I wrote them down, then I would be able to go back and re-read them later.

2. Which book introduced you to Speculative Fiction?

Firestarter by Stephen King

3. Do you have an all-time favorite book? What about it makes it your favorite?

I have favorites in several genres, so I don’t know that I’d be able to chose just one. The one that I’ve probably gone back and re-read the most times is The Forgotten Beasts of Eld by Patricia A. McKillip. (And it makes me cry, every single time.)

4. Which author and/or book inspired you to start writing?

No specific author or book. I have read things that were so wonderful, they made me aspire to write something that would have that kind of impact on someone else. I have also read things that were so bad, I felt there was no reason I couldn’t do better 🙂

5. What would you say is the most important lesson all writers should learn?

Be true to yourself. You can take classes, listen to and apply advice from others, outline every bit of your story or go from the seat of your pants – but regardless, don’t lose your own voice. No one can write what you can.

6. Of the entire publishing process, which would you say is the most difficult aspect to endure?

Probably rejection. It is difficult to spend long hours writing something, putting a part of yourself in it, and sending it out to another person only to have them say they don’t want it, don’t like it, etc. Publishing is a business, and tastes are subjective—but it still stings to get that rejection.

7. From where did the inspiration for your submission arise?

My story is based on The Selkie Bride. I have always been fascinated by stories of shape-changers from the sea who could live among people and then return to the ocean. There is a bittersweet condition in so many of those old legends that the selkie is held in human form against their will because their seal-skin has been stolen from them. Inevitably, when the seal-skin is recovered, the selkie will return to the ocean, even if there is true love between she and her human mate.
I also have a passion for post-apocalyptic fiction, and I was curious to explore what might happen to a diminishing population of selkies after human beings have poisoned the world in some great final war.

8. If applicable, did you have a favorite character (to write) from your story? If so, what sets them apart from the others?

Naia is the main character of my story, and definitely my favorite. I enjoyed exploring what’s left of the human world through her eyes, and the fact that although she has come out of the sea for a specific purpose, she could still come to love the people she meets.

9. On what projects are you currently working?

I have a novella (another post-apocalyptic piece, sort of) that I’ve been working on over the last few months between other projects. Also, the first of a trilogy of “epic” fantasy novels which includes shapeshifters, war against an evil that is apparently unkillable, and the unexpected relationships that can thrive between people who are so disparate. Between all that is the real life stuff, that so often takes precedence—even when I’d rather be writing 🙂

Read Rose’s story, Before the First Day of Winter, in your very own copy of Twice Upon A Time today!

Choose a format…
Amazon|Kindle
Amazon|Paperback

..About the Author..

ROSE BLACKTHORN lives in the high mountain desert of Eastern Utah with her boyfriend and two dogs, Boo and Shadow. She spends her time writing, reading, being crafty, and photographing the surrounding wilderness. An only child, she was lucky to have a mother who loved books, and has been surrounded by them her entire life. Thus instead of squabbling with siblings, she learned to be friends with her imagination and the voices in her head are still very much present.

She is a member of the HWA and has been published online and in print with Necon E-Books, Stupefying Stories, Buzzy Mag, Interstellar Fiction, SpeckLit, Jamais Vu, and the anthologies The Ghost IS the Machine, A Quick Bite of Flesh, Fear the Abyss, The Best of the Horror Society 2013, Enter at Your Own Risk: The End is the Beginning, FEAR: Of the Dark, and Equilibrium Overturned, among others.

..Connect with the Author..

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