Posts tagged ‘Beared Scribe Press’

Twice Upon A Time Blog Tour: An Interview with Nick Nafpliotis

CONTRARY to the title of this anthology, working with such a talented cast of writers is an opportunity that usually comes once in a lifetime. From best-selling to greenhorn, independent or traditionally-published, the authors in this anthology span all ranges in addition to spanning the globe—from England to Australia and all over the United States. I’ve had the privilege of getting to know each and every one of them, and they have become a part of my extended family. I’ve even caught a glimpse of a secret side of them that only another writer…editor…is privy to witness through their words.

Through this series of posts, I plan on introducing you to my new family through a mini-interview of each. You may not get a chance to see their secret side, but you’ll get a sneak-peek into their minds, their passions and inspirations, and what made them the writers they are today.

..The Mini Interview..

1. At what age did you start writing?

Really young, although I can’t quite pinpoint the age. I remember enjoying the act of writing since early elementary school. It has always been a hobby, but I finally decided to get serious about it a few years ago.

2. Which book introduced you to Speculative Fiction?

I’m certain there were others before this, but the My Teacher is an Alien series by Bruce Coville had a huge impact on me. It was written for kids, but had some terrifying horror elements and ended up tackling some huge philosophical questions. That series of books really stuck with me. It also ensured that whenever the school book fair came around, I’d be there to find my next favorite story.

3. Do you have an all-time favorite book? What about it makes it your favorite?

That shifts from year to year. Right now its a toss up between The Cormorant by Chuck Wendig and Broken Monsters by Lauren Beukes.

4. Which author and/or book inspired you to start writing?

This is a weird one—Lewis Grizzard. He was a humor columnist for the Atlanta Journal Constitution back when I was kid. Some pretty severe heart problems eventually caught up with him, taking his life at the age of 47.

I bought some books that were filled with his back issue columns, many of which were written before I was even born. I didn’t get all the pop culture references sometimes, but his words still moved me, mostly to laughter, and sometimes even to tears.

I remember telling my mom how reading his work made him feel like he was alive again. Even though Mr. Grizzard wasn’t around anymore, his work and his thoughts were still able to grab hold of me better than most people could if they were speaking in the same room.

I wasn’t sure at that point if I had the talent to to write (and I’m still pretty shaky on that one to this day), but I thought it would be pretty cool to have that type of impact, to create written words that lived on and touched people’s lives longer after your voice would no longer be heard in the living realm.

…or maybe I just had a narcissistic wish to always be remembered or something.

5. What would you say is the most important lesson all writers should learn?

It’s a process.

I know, I know, it’s a cliche piece of advice, but its one I still keep having to remind myself about.

Even the best writers in the world don’t just wake up one day cranking out bestsellers. They write (and READ) on a daily basis, honing their craft and evolving as artists.

We obviously can’t all be Stephen King or Chuck Wendig or J.K. Rowling, but we can constantly improve our ability to tell stories and speak to readers. That journey alone is worth putting pen to page (or fingers to keyboard).

6. Of the entire publishing process, which would you say is the most difficult aspect to endure?

The stream of rejections that comes vomiting out of your inbox. When that letter comes, it doesn’t matter that your favorite authors also experienced the dreaded ‘we’re sorry, but’ qualifiers to their precious creations. In that moment, it sucks like nothing else.

7. If applicable, did you have a favorite character (to write) from your story? If so, what sets them apart from the others?

My favorite character to write still hasn’t found a home yet, but she’s just getting started 🙂

8. On what projects are you currently working?

I’m currently in the final draft/edits of my first novel, Snipe Hunt. It’s a bit like Lovecraft meets The Goonies (I think).


Read Nick’s story, The Wolf’s Gambit, in your very own copy of Twice Upon A Time today!

..About the Author..

NICK NAFPLIOTIS is a music teacher and writer from Charleston, South Carolina. During the day, he instructs students from the ages of 11-14 on how to play band instruments. At night, he writes about weird crime, bizarre history, pop culture, and humorous classroom experiences on his blog, Rambling Beach Cat. He is also a television, novel, and comic book reviewer for Adventures in Poor Taste.

..Connect with the Author..

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Twice Upon A Time Blog Tour: An Interview with Bobbie Palmer

CONTRARY to the title of this anthology, working with such a talented cast of writers is an opportunity that usually comes once in a lifetime. From best-selling to greenhorn, independent or traditionally-published, the authors in this anthology span all ranges in addition to spanning the globe—from England to Australia and all over the United States. I’ve had the privilege of getting to know each and every one of them, and they have become a part of my extended family. I’ve even caught a glimpse of a secret side of them that only another writer…editor…is privy to witness through their words.

Through this series of posts, I plan on introducing you to my new family through a mini-interview of each. You may not get a chance to see their secret side, but you’ll get a sneak-peek into their minds, their passions and inspirations, and what made them the writers they are today.

..The Mini Interview..

1. At what age did you start writing?

I wrote my first story in 6th grade for a class assignment and I haven’t been able to stop.

2. Which book introduced you to Speculative Fiction?

Harry Potter; it opened me up to a world I never knew existed.

3. Do you have an all-time favorite book? What about it makes it your favorite?

The Mercy Thompson series by Patricia Briggs. When I first read it, I fell in love with the writing style and I felt like I connected to Mercy.

4. Which author and/or book inspired you to start writing?

Stephen King. His determination to have his work out there is inspiring.

5. What would you say is the most important lesson all writers should learn?

Writers need to rember to have fun. Its too easy to get caught up in edits and promoting. Both are important, but you need to have fun writing so you keep doing it. Don’t let the pressure get to you.

6. Of the entire publishing process, which would you say is the most difficult aspect to endure?

Edits. I like getting lost in the story. When you edit you can’t, you need to check grammar and spelling, make sure the story flows.

7. If applicable, did you have a favorite character (to write) from your story? If so, what sets them apart the others?

Scarlette Gunn. She’s the main character in a series I’ve been working on for a few years. She is who I want to be, but won’t become. She stands up for herself and won’t let anyone beat her down.

8. On what projects are you currently working?

My latest paranormal romance, Emily’s Captive, was just released on May 30, 2015.


Read Bobbie’s story, Iron Strong Adalie, in your very own copy of Twice Upon A Time today!

..About the Author..

BOBBIE PALMER writes both paranormal and thriller novels. She loves reading just about anything and when she’s not writing she has her nose stuck in a book. She loves to cook and hang out with her nephews and two cats. She is very involved in the writing community, hosting a writer’s breakfast once a month and a former municipal liaison for NaNoWriMo.

..Connect with the Author..

Twice Upon A Time Blog Tour: An Interview with Kelly Hale

CONTRARY to the title of this anthology, working with such a talented cast of writers is an opportunity that usually comes once in a lifetime. From best-selling to greenhorn, independent or traditionally-published, the authors in this anthology span all ranges in addition to spanning the globe—from England to Australia and all over the United States. I’ve had the privilege of getting to know each and every one of them, and they have become a part of my extended family. I’ve even caught a glimpse of a secret side of them that only another writer…editor…is privy to witness through their words.

Through this series of posts, I plan on introducing you to my new family through a mini-interview of each. You may not get a chance to see their secret side, but you’ll get a sneak-peek into their minds, their passions and inspirations, and what made them the writers they are today.

..The Mini Interview..

1. At what age did you start writing?

Ten. By thirteen I was writing short stories, plotting out novels that were far too unwieldy for my skills. I also wrote Star Trek fanfiction (although I don’t think it had an official name yet. It was 1969).

2. Which book introduced you to Speculative Fiction?

Beauty, by Sheri S. Tepper. I’m pretty sure I’d read speculative fiction prior but Beauty was the first one that I said, “oh, this is that thing which isn’t exactly science fiction but also isn’t remotely mainstream. I’m going to write this.”

3. Do you have an all-time favorite book? What about it makes it your favorite?

That is a horrible question to ask a writer, you know. Currently, my all time favorite book would be Fingersmith by Sarah Waters. The way the clues to the twist have been layered in from the first page and you only realize it at the same time as the narrator, when it’s too late and you’re hit with the same crushing betrayal and rage and desperate fear. As a writer, it’s kind of awe-inspiring. I’m so glad I knew nothing about it when I began the read.

4. Which author and/or book inspired you to start writing?

To really really start writing? Margaret Atwood and The Handmaid’s Tale. She boldly claimed she didn’t write science fiction, damn it, she wrote fiction. All fiction speculates. It’s all fiction. Plus, that’s a brilliant little book.

5. What would you say is the most important lesson all writers should learn?

Most important, trite but true, write because you love it, because you want to, because it challenges you and also gives you joy. Odds are you will not become rich from writing, you may never make enough from it to live on. There was a great cartoon in The New Yorker once, showing a guy on the street selling pencils and the caption was, “Sold my first story and foolishly quit my day job.” Don’t do that.

6. Of the entire publishing process, which would you say is the most difficult aspect to endure?

Well, your work is going to be rejected so you have to get over that. The toughest I think for most writers (as most of us are introverts) is having to self-promote. It’s easier now because of the internet, but not that long ago when print publishing was starting to slow, publishers required new work to be all lined up with blurbs and glowing reviews before they signed a contract with you. Which worked fine, I suppose, if you’d gone through Clarion or another prestigious workshop. If not you were forced to beg for a person who didn’t know you to “please, please, please read my book and write a little blurb!”

7. From where did the inspiration for your submission arise?

I was thinking about women as exploitable commodities now and throughout history. So my story was going to deal with that in some way. I have always been interested in the cultural clashes and co-mingling of the early interactions between white traders and Native Americans. So I began with the idea of a Shoshone man who offers his daughter to a mountain man in exchange for saving his life. The similarities of mythical figures from varied cultures is one of the most consistent connecting threads of our humanity. There is always a beast somewhere that can be tamed, tricked, or rescued by a woman.

8. If applicable, did you have a favorite character (to write) from your story? If so, what sets them apart from the others?

My favorite character is, of course, Dove, the narrator. I liked her from the moment she started talking. I think every narrator is my favorite character when I’m writing them though.

9. On what projects are you currently working?

I am working on three novels and must soon decide which one I’m going to spend the next six months working on until the end. One is a time-travel, YA thingy called The Moontree Women. The other is the second novel in my Erasing Sherlock series. And the third is an expansion of a short story called Project Thunderbird, which is due out in March 2015 in the anthology Liberating Earth, edited by Kate Orman.


Read Kelly’s story, Blood Medicine, in your very own copy of Twice Upon A Time today!

..About the Author..

KELLY HALE lives in the beautiful Pacific Northwest where the streets are paved with espresso beans and the garbage recycles itself. She is the author of a bunch of short stories in a bunch of anthologies, and a couple of novels (including the award-winning Erasing Sherlock). She has loved science fiction and fantasy for so long that the characters from the original Star Trek represent archetypes in her dreams.

..Connect with the Author..

Twice Upon A Time Blog Tour: An Interview with KR Green

CONTRARY to the title of this anthology, working with such a talented cast of writers is an opportunity that usually comes once in a lifetime. From best-selling to greenhorn, independent or traditionally-published, the authors in this anthology span all ranges in addition to spanning the globe—from England to Australia and all over the United States. I’ve had the privilege of getting to know each and every one of them, and they have become a part of my extended family. I’ve even caught a glimpse of a secret side of them that only another writer…editor…is privy to witness through their words.

Through this series of posts, I plan on introducing you to my new family through a mini-interview of each. You may not get a chance to see their secret side, but you’ll get a sneak-peek into their minds, their passions and inspirations, and what made them the writers they are today.

..The Mini Interview..

1. At what age did you start writing?

I used to use my grandmother’s typewriter when I was around 6 or 7, and finished my first story on it. But when I was 19, I tried National Novel Writing Month. I ‘won’ this, completing a 50,000 word draft in 30 days, and that gave me the boost to try writing on a regular and more dedicated basis.

2. Which book introduced you to Speculative Fiction?

I grew up reading about animals who talked and curses/prophecies. The most influential for me was The Sight by David-Clement Davies. Mixing a strange-to-me landscape, wolf gods, sentient animals, and prophecies was my window into fantasy and supernatural books.

3. Do you have an all-time favorite book? What about it makes it your favorite?

My favourite book is probably still The Moon Riders by Theresa Tomlinson. It introduced me to strong female characters, spoke of living in harmony with the seasons, and held divination and dance as sacred powers. In terms of writing, it’s the book I remember when I need to create more tension because the main character survives and manages so many devastating events.

4. Which author and/or book inspired you to start writing?

I began writing more seriously due to a friend asking me to do National Novel Writing Month with her. When I’m stuck or struggling to write how I want to, I re-read Dianne Sylvan’s first Shadow World book, Queen of Shadows. I personally find her writing style works for me, and I own nearly every book she’s written, so she’s definitely a positive influence.

5. What would you say is the most important lesson all writers should learn?

Perseverance. And because picking just one is tricky, I’d also say to expect your first drafts and early planning to have gaps, holes, issues or be plain rubbish. Writing isn’t a race. I believe even well-known, prolific writers have rubbish chapters in their first drafts and sit staring at a scene wondering how on earth they can fix it. Therefore, my two-sided advice is to not rush the process—to give the writing time to breathe and yourself time to recharge when writing. However, don’t give up. Don’t let your writing sit in a drawer for too long. Keep moving forward, step by step.

6. Of the entire publishing process, which would you say is the most difficult aspect to endure?

It’s difficult to pinpoint something specifically in publishing, but while people at the publishing end are getting things sorted, the author can be left waiting without much communication (as they’re busy getting things rolling) at times.

7. From where did the inspiration for your submission arise?

I studied the story of Taliesin as a module on Celtic mythology, so I felt familiar with the symbols and messages often found within it.

8. If applicable, did you have a favorite character (to write) from your story? If so, what sets them apart from the others?

When I studied the tale, it rarely gave Morfran’s view of this magic to be bestowed upon him; that led me to tell his side of the story—with his secret power and the balance of wanting his own life versus pleasing those around him.

9. On what projects are you currently working?

I’m currently editing a young adult novel draft which focuses on a young falconer and her hawk discovering the secrets of a city during rebellion.


Read K.R. Green’s story, The Night of Awen, in your very own copy of Twice Upon A Time today!

..About the Author..

KRGREEN writes about dragons, falconry, mythology, and sorcery. She attends a local writing group, and outside of writing enjoys herbal teas, reading, and gazing up at the stars. When she isn’t painting pictures with words, she works in the Mental Health sector in London and for Children’s Services in Sussex.

..Connect with the Author..

Twice Upon A Time Blog Tour: An Interview with Tarran Jones

CONTRARY to the title of this anthology, working with such a talented cast of writers is an opportunity that usually comes once in a lifetime. From best-selling to greenhorn, independent or traditionally-published, the authors in this anthology span all ranges in addition to spanning the globe—from England to Australia and all over the United States. I’ve had the privilege of getting to know each and every one of them, and they have become a part of my extended family. I’ve even caught a glimpse of a secret side of them that only another writer…editor…is privy to witness through their words.

Through this series of posts, I plan on introducing you to my new family through a mini-interview of each. You may not get a chance to see their secret side, but you’ll get a sneak-peek into their minds, their passions and inspirations, and what made them the writers they are today.

..The Mini Interview..

1. At what age did you start writing?

I started writing at about age five. My first short story was about a white sports car with black velvet seats.

2. Which book introduced you to Speculative Fiction?

I would have to say there were two books that introduced me to Speculative Fiction: The Lion, Witch, and the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis and The Neverending Story by Michael Ende. These two books changed my world.

3. Do you have an all-time favorite book? What about it makes it your favorite?

I have a wide range of favourite books that I read. If I had to choose one, it would be Tamora Pierce‘s world of Tortall, especially her Song of the Lioness Quartet. Alanna: The First Adventure is the first book in that series. I love the threads of magic, life, and love that are woven throughout the series; I loved the characters, too, whom we get to see grow and develop.

4. Which author and/or book inspired you to start writing?

C.S. Lewis, Michael Ende, and Tamora Pierce. I loved these authors’ worlds, and I wanted to create worlds just like them, filled with so much life and soul.

5. What would you say is the most important lesson all writers should learn?

Never give up! Writing is a hard business with constant rejection. Develop a hard skin, suck it up, and learn from it. Choose your Beta Readers with care, as you will want the truth and not fluff.

6. Of the entire publishing process, which would you say is the most difficult aspect to endure?

The waiting. That is the hardest part for me. All you can do is try not to stress and keep writing.

7. If applicable, did you have a favorite character (to write) from your story? If so, what sets them apart from the others?

I loved writing Sigrun. She rose from being a scared little girl to the formidable woman who eventually gets justice.

8. On what projects are you currently working?

I have a full-length fantasy manuscript, Stones of Power, which has been picked up by Satalyte Publishing. I also have a few other short stories submitted to various magazines and collections.


Read Tarran’s story, All That Glitters, in your very own copy of Twice Upon A Time today!

..About the Author..

TARRAN JONES works at Collins Booksellers Edwardstown. She lives in Adelaide, Australia with her partner and young daughter. Tarran has been in the book industry selling other people’s books for over 10 years and thought it was about time she started thinking about her own. She has finished her first novel, Stones of Power, and is now writing the second. Tarran has previously written articles, reviews, and blog posts for her bookstore’s blog and has written a great many short stories and one unpublished novella. She has had three short stories published online and was a finalist in the Australian Literature Review short story competition for one of her works. She loves writing all kinds of speculative fiction and thinks that it fires up the imagination. Gardening is one of Tarran’s passions and when she isn’t writing she can be found out in the vegetable garden talking to the plants.

..Connect with the Author..

Twice Upon A Time Blog Tour: An Interview with Elizabeth J. Norton

CONTRARY to the title of this anthology, working with such a talented cast of writers is an opportunity that usually comes once in a lifetime. From best-selling to greenhorn, independent or traditionally-published, the authors in this anthology span all ranges in addition to spanning the globe—from England to Australia and all over the United States. I’ve had the privilege of getting to know each and every one of them, and they have become a part of my extended family. I’ve even caught a glimpse of a secret side of them that only another writer…editor…is privy to witness through their words.

Through this series of posts, I plan on introducing you to my new family through a mini-interview of each. You may not get a chance to see their secret side, but you’ll get a sneak-peek into their minds, their passions and inspirations, and what made them the writers they are today.

..The Mini Interview..

1. At what age did you start writing?

When I was in first grade, I was asked for a classroom yearbook what I wanted to be when I grew up. I replied, “a writer.” I think if it started anywhere, it was there.

2. Which book introduced you to Speculative Fiction?

Hard question, but the first speculative fiction book I remember is The BFG by Roald Dahl, which my teacher read to our class in fourth grade.

3. Do you have an all-time favorite book? What about it makes it your favorite?

As a librarian, I would like to register that this question is not fair!! I adore the Saving Mars Series by Cidney Swanson for the absolutely glorious combination of flawless world-building and unforgettable characters. They’re smart, fun, suspenseful—just all around fabulous.

4. Which author and/or book inspired you to start writing?

I began writing Swan Song after meeting author Joelle Charbonneau of the Testing Trilogy. At this signing, Joelle encouraged me to write 100 words a day for 100 days. I had to tweet her my word count every day, and if I missed a day, I would have to start over. And so it went. Every day I wrote, every day I tweeted. Every day she tweeted back. Joelle is an amazing cheerleader and a wonderful author. I couldn’t have done this without her. And if you’re a fan of dystopian fiction, the Testing Trilogy is top-notch.

5. What would you say is the most important lesson all writers should learn?

Draft the whole story out before you edit. The little things that become important in the end will shock you.

6. Of the entire publishing process, which would you say is the most difficult aspect to endure?

As stated above, drafting without editing is really difficult for me. I tend to be very critical of myself and want to pick things apart and over analyze them. During bad writing days, I sometimes wanted to scrap the whole thing. Sometimes I didn’t know where the story was going. It was hard on my inner critic, but we got there in the end.

7. If applicable, did you have a favorite character (to write) from your story? If so, what sets them apart from the others?

My main man, Luc, was easy to write but hard to have in my brain. He’s already been through the mill by the time we meet him, and I could feel all his pain acutely. I had the most fun with Nik, though, because he surprised me all the time. He’s much more complex than we get to see in this story and I would love to revisit him someday.

8. On what projects are you currently working?

I have ideas for both a prequel and a sequel for Swan Song, which are in early plotting stages.


Read Elizabeth’s story, Swan Song, in your very own copy of Twice Upon A Time today!

..About the Author..

ELIZABETH J. NORTON has been the Teen Librarian the Commerce Township Community Library since 2007. An avid reader, writer, knitter, coffee addict, and the Assistant Editor (a.k.a. Head Minion) of The Bearded Scribe Press’ blog; she also reviews young adult and professional books for Voice of Youth Advocates Magazine. She lives in metro Detroit with her cat, Bianca, and too many books

..Connect with the Author..

Twice Upon A Time Blog Tour: An Interview with Tracy Arthur Soldan

CONTRARY to the title of this anthology, working with such a talented cast of writers is an opportunity that usually comes once in a lifetime. From best-selling to greenhorn, independent or traditionally-published, the authors in this anthology span all ranges in addition to spanning the globe—from England to Australia and all over the United States. I’ve had the privilege of getting to know each and every one of them, and they have become a part of my extended family. I’ve even caught a glimpse of a secret side of them that only another writer…editor…is privy to witness through their words.

Through this series of posts, I plan on introducing you to my new family through a mini-interview of each. You may not get a chance to see their secret side, but you’ll get a sneak-peek into their minds, their passions and inspirations, and what made them the writers they are today.

..The Mini Interview..

1. At what age did you start writing?

Forty-nine. I was on a long layover at Reagan National in August 2013 when an inspiration hit me. Writing wasn’t on my radar at all until that moment, but it was so vivid I had to write it down immediately; it’s still with me, and I’m still working on it. Prior to that, my only actual fiction writing was my involvement in an APA, or amateur press association, for about a year in the early 90s, primarily because a friend was also involved. Sinobrody 0.9.8 is my first published work.

2. Which book introduced you to Speculative Fiction?

I have no idea. I discovered this wonderful edifice called a “library” about the time I was 6, and spent my summers there; I think I was the youngest person to ever request an interlibrary loan there. It was unusual for a small rural library in 1969 to have a section for speculative fiction, and I think I read just about everything that had a rocket ship or atom symbol on the spine. The first book I can clearly recall is The Left Hand of Darkness by Ursula Le Guin; I was the first person to check it out when a copy arrived in the summer of 1970.

3. Do you have an all-time favorite book? What about it makes it your favorite?

The Left Hand of Darkness. Le Guin‘s narrative powers were at their peak, and the exploration of a truly gender-neutral society was heady stuff for a 7-year-old boy. But realizing the implications of Estraven entering kemmer with Genly, the only other person around, was my first “whoa moment” from reading SF.

4. Which author and/or book inspired you to start writing?

I can’t say there is one for me. I sometimes joke about the Muses collectively deciding, “Him. That’s the guy,” and showing up uninvited to whisper, cajole, declaim, and dictate to me while raiding my stockpile of Cheetos.

5. What would you say is the most important lesson all writers should learn?

Write it down. Just do it. Digital docs, typewritten, handwritten notebooks, cuneiform tablets…if you don’t discipline yourself to Just Write It, regardless of the format or whether you’d rather just vegetate on the couch, you’ll never get to where writing is the seemingly-natural action so many writers exhibit. And that’s when the magic *really* starts to happen. You want to get there, trust me, you do, so Just Write It.

6. Of the entire publishing process, which would you say is the most difficult aspect to endure?

Waiting for feedback. Urgh. A zillion what-ifs chasing each other—your hopes, your expectations, and your fears—around. Developing a small, reliable group of Beta readers is something every writer should do, they’ll tell you what’s not quite right before you share it with the world at large.

7. If applicable, did you have a favorite character (to write) from your story? If so, what sets them apart from the others?

Sinobrody himself. Getting into his head to figure out *why* he was doing what he was doing was a remarkable experience. He has a history that is barely touched on in the story, but it informs everything about him.

8. On what projects are you currently working?

That inspiration at the airport has taken on a life of its own, becoming a series of seven novels and a growing number of shorter works, in an alternate history setting. There are stories to be told over a 10,000 year span, from the Neolithic to a few hundred years in the future. I hope to have the first novel, Niall’s Vale, in publishable shape by the end of 2015. I also have something in mind for the second volume of Twice Upon A Time.


Read Tracy’s story, Sinobrody 0.9.8, in your very own copy of Twice Upon A Time today!

..About the Author..

TRACY ARTHUR SOLDAN is a recent transplant from the Pacific Northwest to Roswell, GA. He works for a large multinational you’ve never heard of because its industry is neither sexy nor controversial. He discovered science fiction and fantasy almost as soon as he learned how to read. He was introduced to roleplaying games (RPGs) with Blue Book D&D, and has been active in Live-Action Roleplaying (LARPing) for nearly 20 years. He wonders why the Muses waited until he was 48 before deciding to start inflicting him with stories to write. He lives alone, with no pets. Not even a goldfish.

..Connect with the Author..

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