Posts from the ‘Writing’ Category

Book Launch – Gillian Polack – The Wizardry of Jewish Women

The fantastic Gillian Polack is releasing her new book ‘The Wizardry of Jewish Women’ at Readings, Hawthorn on the 5th of September at 6:30pm. A delightful, poignant novel that details the lives of Jewish women in Canberra. Mystical, memorial, and cheeky – come and experience the launch of one the next talked about spec-fiction books to be released this year. There may even be pink tutu’s involved.

Gillian Polack Launch Picture

Tales From The Scribe is now LIVE

That is right.

You can now read my collection ‘Tales From The Scribe’ It is officially live on Amazon with the Kindle and print version.

Book Depository available HERE

Kindle available HERE

Amazon Paperback available HERE

Kobo available HERE

Smashwords available HERE

Tales From The Scribe: A Collection

Tales From The Scribe: A Collection

Time twisting, dystopian, and epic fantasy stories

Tale of Cerdiwen
Cerdiwen of Llyr was thrown into another time. Suddenly faced with the real people and situations she was just reading about, will Cerdiwen be able to do as Taliesin instructed? Can she save her mother?

Life After Death
What really happens to us after we die? A question asked by many over the years. Gillian goes on a dark journey to discover her own life and death.

Dance of the Gods
Looking a noble in the eyes is punishable by death. This is what Ryukan faces when he comes across a noblewoman who is lost in the woods. Can the Dance of the Gods change Ryukan’s fate?

Icons of Power
Australia is in ruins.
Light and Dark are fighting for control of the Icons of Power. Whomever has then, can change the world. The race is on to gain control of the last Icon.

It has started to get some great reviews already!

Jul 15, 2016 Kayla rated it liked it 3 Stars

Tales from the Scribe consists of a collection of four short stories by Adelaide writer, Tarran Jones, and joined by a mystical theme. Each short story is broken into chapters, making it easy to read in small bursts, or as a whole. The e-book version which I read was beautifully typeset and visually appealing throughout.
The first story is Journey of Cerdiwen and centres around a Druid girl, Cerdiwen who time travels during a ceremony to change the course of history. The goddess, Epona, guides
her hand, leading her through time to her mother (from whom she was stolen) in time to prevent a war.
The second, Life and Death, is perhaps the one I engaged with most. It follows Gillian, a woman who commits suicide, through her journey into the afterlife. It speculates about reincarnation, and the beginning and end of life being centred on blood and pain.
Read the whole review HERE

Kathryn White reviews it on her site

Tales From the Scribe by Adelaide author Tarran Jones moves at a fast, though strangely dreamlike pace where the imagery and setting can change in an instant–and it works.

Read more HERE

School Workshops

I recently did my first workshop at a school last Tuesday. It was about fractured fairytales and it went really great. I was really nervous before going in but once I was there, my nerves settled. I talked to five year 8 classes about how to fracture a fairy tale and also the history of fairytales, myths and what type of genres they could insert their stories into. Then I set them loose to create their own tales and it was fantastic to listen to what they all came up with. Such an imaginative group of kids. I hope to do more in the future.

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Twice Upon A Time Blog Tour: An Interview with Nick Nafpliotis

CONTRARY to the title of this anthology, working with such a talented cast of writers is an opportunity that usually comes once in a lifetime. From best-selling to greenhorn, independent or traditionally-published, the authors in this anthology span all ranges in addition to spanning the globe—from England to Australia and all over the United States. I’ve had the privilege of getting to know each and every one of them, and they have become a part of my extended family. I’ve even caught a glimpse of a secret side of them that only another writer…editor…is privy to witness through their words.

Through this series of posts, I plan on introducing you to my new family through a mini-interview of each. You may not get a chance to see their secret side, but you’ll get a sneak-peek into their minds, their passions and inspirations, and what made them the writers they are today.

..The Mini Interview..

1. At what age did you start writing?

Really young, although I can’t quite pinpoint the age. I remember enjoying the act of writing since early elementary school. It has always been a hobby, but I finally decided to get serious about it a few years ago.

2. Which book introduced you to Speculative Fiction?

I’m certain there were others before this, but the My Teacher is an Alien series by Bruce Coville had a huge impact on me. It was written for kids, but had some terrifying horror elements and ended up tackling some huge philosophical questions. That series of books really stuck with me. It also ensured that whenever the school book fair came around, I’d be there to find my next favorite story.

3. Do you have an all-time favorite book? What about it makes it your favorite?

That shifts from year to year. Right now its a toss up between The Cormorant by Chuck Wendig and Broken Monsters by Lauren Beukes.

4. Which author and/or book inspired you to start writing?

This is a weird one—Lewis Grizzard. He was a humor columnist for the Atlanta Journal Constitution back when I was kid. Some pretty severe heart problems eventually caught up with him, taking his life at the age of 47.

I bought some books that were filled with his back issue columns, many of which were written before I was even born. I didn’t get all the pop culture references sometimes, but his words still moved me, mostly to laughter, and sometimes even to tears.

I remember telling my mom how reading his work made him feel like he was alive again. Even though Mr. Grizzard wasn’t around anymore, his work and his thoughts were still able to grab hold of me better than most people could if they were speaking in the same room.

I wasn’t sure at that point if I had the talent to to write (and I’m still pretty shaky on that one to this day), but I thought it would be pretty cool to have that type of impact, to create written words that lived on and touched people’s lives longer after your voice would no longer be heard in the living realm.

…or maybe I just had a narcissistic wish to always be remembered or something.

5. What would you say is the most important lesson all writers should learn?

It’s a process.

I know, I know, it’s a cliche piece of advice, but its one I still keep having to remind myself about.

Even the best writers in the world don’t just wake up one day cranking out bestsellers. They write (and READ) on a daily basis, honing their craft and evolving as artists.

We obviously can’t all be Stephen King or Chuck Wendig or J.K. Rowling, but we can constantly improve our ability to tell stories and speak to readers. That journey alone is worth putting pen to page (or fingers to keyboard).

6. Of the entire publishing process, which would you say is the most difficult aspect to endure?

The stream of rejections that comes vomiting out of your inbox. When that letter comes, it doesn’t matter that your favorite authors also experienced the dreaded ‘we’re sorry, but’ qualifiers to their precious creations. In that moment, it sucks like nothing else.

7. If applicable, did you have a favorite character (to write) from your story? If so, what sets them apart from the others?

My favorite character to write still hasn’t found a home yet, but she’s just getting started 🙂

8. On what projects are you currently working?

I’m currently in the final draft/edits of my first novel, Snipe Hunt. It’s a bit like Lovecraft meets The Goonies (I think).


Read Nick’s story, The Wolf’s Gambit, in your very own copy of Twice Upon A Time today!

..About the Author..

NICK NAFPLIOTIS is a music teacher and writer from Charleston, South Carolina. During the day, he instructs students from the ages of 11-14 on how to play band instruments. At night, he writes about weird crime, bizarre history, pop culture, and humorous classroom experiences on his blog, Rambling Beach Cat. He is also a television, novel, and comic book reviewer for Adventures in Poor Taste.

..Connect with the Author..

Twice Upon A Time Blog Tour: An Interview with Bobbie Palmer

CONTRARY to the title of this anthology, working with such a talented cast of writers is an opportunity that usually comes once in a lifetime. From best-selling to greenhorn, independent or traditionally-published, the authors in this anthology span all ranges in addition to spanning the globe—from England to Australia and all over the United States. I’ve had the privilege of getting to know each and every one of them, and they have become a part of my extended family. I’ve even caught a glimpse of a secret side of them that only another writer…editor…is privy to witness through their words.

Through this series of posts, I plan on introducing you to my new family through a mini-interview of each. You may not get a chance to see their secret side, but you’ll get a sneak-peek into their minds, their passions and inspirations, and what made them the writers they are today.

..The Mini Interview..

1. At what age did you start writing?

I wrote my first story in 6th grade for a class assignment and I haven’t been able to stop.

2. Which book introduced you to Speculative Fiction?

Harry Potter; it opened me up to a world I never knew existed.

3. Do you have an all-time favorite book? What about it makes it your favorite?

The Mercy Thompson series by Patricia Briggs. When I first read it, I fell in love with the writing style and I felt like I connected to Mercy.

4. Which author and/or book inspired you to start writing?

Stephen King. His determination to have his work out there is inspiring.

5. What would you say is the most important lesson all writers should learn?

Writers need to rember to have fun. Its too easy to get caught up in edits and promoting. Both are important, but you need to have fun writing so you keep doing it. Don’t let the pressure get to you.

6. Of the entire publishing process, which would you say is the most difficult aspect to endure?

Edits. I like getting lost in the story. When you edit you can’t, you need to check grammar and spelling, make sure the story flows.

7. If applicable, did you have a favorite character (to write) from your story? If so, what sets them apart the others?

Scarlette Gunn. She’s the main character in a series I’ve been working on for a few years. She is who I want to be, but won’t become. She stands up for herself and won’t let anyone beat her down.

8. On what projects are you currently working?

My latest paranormal romance, Emily’s Captive, was just released on May 30, 2015.


Read Bobbie’s story, Iron Strong Adalie, in your very own copy of Twice Upon A Time today!

..About the Author..

BOBBIE PALMER writes both paranormal and thriller novels. She loves reading just about anything and when she’s not writing she has her nose stuck in a book. She loves to cook and hang out with her nephews and two cats. She is very involved in the writing community, hosting a writer’s breakfast once a month and a former municipal liaison for NaNoWriMo.

..Connect with the Author..

Twice Upon A Time Blog Tour: An Interview with Kelly Hale

CONTRARY to the title of this anthology, working with such a talented cast of writers is an opportunity that usually comes once in a lifetime. From best-selling to greenhorn, independent or traditionally-published, the authors in this anthology span all ranges in addition to spanning the globe—from England to Australia and all over the United States. I’ve had the privilege of getting to know each and every one of them, and they have become a part of my extended family. I’ve even caught a glimpse of a secret side of them that only another writer…editor…is privy to witness through their words.

Through this series of posts, I plan on introducing you to my new family through a mini-interview of each. You may not get a chance to see their secret side, but you’ll get a sneak-peek into their minds, their passions and inspirations, and what made them the writers they are today.

..The Mini Interview..

1. At what age did you start writing?

Ten. By thirteen I was writing short stories, plotting out novels that were far too unwieldy for my skills. I also wrote Star Trek fanfiction (although I don’t think it had an official name yet. It was 1969).

2. Which book introduced you to Speculative Fiction?

Beauty, by Sheri S. Tepper. I’m pretty sure I’d read speculative fiction prior but Beauty was the first one that I said, “oh, this is that thing which isn’t exactly science fiction but also isn’t remotely mainstream. I’m going to write this.”

3. Do you have an all-time favorite book? What about it makes it your favorite?

That is a horrible question to ask a writer, you know. Currently, my all time favorite book would be Fingersmith by Sarah Waters. The way the clues to the twist have been layered in from the first page and you only realize it at the same time as the narrator, when it’s too late and you’re hit with the same crushing betrayal and rage and desperate fear. As a writer, it’s kind of awe-inspiring. I’m so glad I knew nothing about it when I began the read.

4. Which author and/or book inspired you to start writing?

To really really start writing? Margaret Atwood and The Handmaid’s Tale. She boldly claimed she didn’t write science fiction, damn it, she wrote fiction. All fiction speculates. It’s all fiction. Plus, that’s a brilliant little book.

5. What would you say is the most important lesson all writers should learn?

Most important, trite but true, write because you love it, because you want to, because it challenges you and also gives you joy. Odds are you will not become rich from writing, you may never make enough from it to live on. There was a great cartoon in The New Yorker once, showing a guy on the street selling pencils and the caption was, “Sold my first story and foolishly quit my day job.” Don’t do that.

6. Of the entire publishing process, which would you say is the most difficult aspect to endure?

Well, your work is going to be rejected so you have to get over that. The toughest I think for most writers (as most of us are introverts) is having to self-promote. It’s easier now because of the internet, but not that long ago when print publishing was starting to slow, publishers required new work to be all lined up with blurbs and glowing reviews before they signed a contract with you. Which worked fine, I suppose, if you’d gone through Clarion or another prestigious workshop. If not you were forced to beg for a person who didn’t know you to “please, please, please read my book and write a little blurb!”

7. From where did the inspiration for your submission arise?

I was thinking about women as exploitable commodities now and throughout history. So my story was going to deal with that in some way. I have always been interested in the cultural clashes and co-mingling of the early interactions between white traders and Native Americans. So I began with the idea of a Shoshone man who offers his daughter to a mountain man in exchange for saving his life. The similarities of mythical figures from varied cultures is one of the most consistent connecting threads of our humanity. There is always a beast somewhere that can be tamed, tricked, or rescued by a woman.

8. If applicable, did you have a favorite character (to write) from your story? If so, what sets them apart from the others?

My favorite character is, of course, Dove, the narrator. I liked her from the moment she started talking. I think every narrator is my favorite character when I’m writing them though.

9. On what projects are you currently working?

I am working on three novels and must soon decide which one I’m going to spend the next six months working on until the end. One is a time-travel, YA thingy called The Moontree Women. The other is the second novel in my Erasing Sherlock series. And the third is an expansion of a short story called Project Thunderbird, which is due out in March 2015 in the anthology Liberating Earth, edited by Kate Orman.


Read Kelly’s story, Blood Medicine, in your very own copy of Twice Upon A Time today!

..About the Author..

KELLY HALE lives in the beautiful Pacific Northwest where the streets are paved with espresso beans and the garbage recycles itself. She is the author of a bunch of short stories in a bunch of anthologies, and a couple of novels (including the award-winning Erasing Sherlock). She has loved science fiction and fantasy for so long that the characters from the original Star Trek represent archetypes in her dreams.

..Connect with the Author..

Twice Upon A Time Blog Tour: An Interview with KR Green

CONTRARY to the title of this anthology, working with such a talented cast of writers is an opportunity that usually comes once in a lifetime. From best-selling to greenhorn, independent or traditionally-published, the authors in this anthology span all ranges in addition to spanning the globe—from England to Australia and all over the United States. I’ve had the privilege of getting to know each and every one of them, and they have become a part of my extended family. I’ve even caught a glimpse of a secret side of them that only another writer…editor…is privy to witness through their words.

Through this series of posts, I plan on introducing you to my new family through a mini-interview of each. You may not get a chance to see their secret side, but you’ll get a sneak-peek into their minds, their passions and inspirations, and what made them the writers they are today.

..The Mini Interview..

1. At what age did you start writing?

I used to use my grandmother’s typewriter when I was around 6 or 7, and finished my first story on it. But when I was 19, I tried National Novel Writing Month. I ‘won’ this, completing a 50,000 word draft in 30 days, and that gave me the boost to try writing on a regular and more dedicated basis.

2. Which book introduced you to Speculative Fiction?

I grew up reading about animals who talked and curses/prophecies. The most influential for me was The Sight by David-Clement Davies. Mixing a strange-to-me landscape, wolf gods, sentient animals, and prophecies was my window into fantasy and supernatural books.

3. Do you have an all-time favorite book? What about it makes it your favorite?

My favourite book is probably still The Moon Riders by Theresa Tomlinson. It introduced me to strong female characters, spoke of living in harmony with the seasons, and held divination and dance as sacred powers. In terms of writing, it’s the book I remember when I need to create more tension because the main character survives and manages so many devastating events.

4. Which author and/or book inspired you to start writing?

I began writing more seriously due to a friend asking me to do National Novel Writing Month with her. When I’m stuck or struggling to write how I want to, I re-read Dianne Sylvan’s first Shadow World book, Queen of Shadows. I personally find her writing style works for me, and I own nearly every book she’s written, so she’s definitely a positive influence.

5. What would you say is the most important lesson all writers should learn?

Perseverance. And because picking just one is tricky, I’d also say to expect your first drafts and early planning to have gaps, holes, issues or be plain rubbish. Writing isn’t a race. I believe even well-known, prolific writers have rubbish chapters in their first drafts and sit staring at a scene wondering how on earth they can fix it. Therefore, my two-sided advice is to not rush the process—to give the writing time to breathe and yourself time to recharge when writing. However, don’t give up. Don’t let your writing sit in a drawer for too long. Keep moving forward, step by step.

6. Of the entire publishing process, which would you say is the most difficult aspect to endure?

It’s difficult to pinpoint something specifically in publishing, but while people at the publishing end are getting things sorted, the author can be left waiting without much communication (as they’re busy getting things rolling) at times.

7. From where did the inspiration for your submission arise?

I studied the story of Taliesin as a module on Celtic mythology, so I felt familiar with the symbols and messages often found within it.

8. If applicable, did you have a favorite character (to write) from your story? If so, what sets them apart from the others?

When I studied the tale, it rarely gave Morfran’s view of this magic to be bestowed upon him; that led me to tell his side of the story—with his secret power and the balance of wanting his own life versus pleasing those around him.

9. On what projects are you currently working?

I’m currently editing a young adult novel draft which focuses on a young falconer and her hawk discovering the secrets of a city during rebellion.


Read K.R. Green’s story, The Night of Awen, in your very own copy of Twice Upon A Time today!

..About the Author..

KRGREEN writes about dragons, falconry, mythology, and sorcery. She attends a local writing group, and outside of writing enjoys herbal teas, reading, and gazing up at the stars. When she isn’t painting pictures with words, she works in the Mental Health sector in London and for Children’s Services in Sussex.

..Connect with the Author..

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